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Reader Question: How Would You Handle This Window?

I had a friend and blog reader contact me yesterday about an issue she has with the house and she and her husband are currently remodeling. Her question stumped me, so I offered to present the issue to all of you to see if one of you might have a brilliant suggestion for her!

Karen wrote to me yesterday after reading my last blog post to get more info on how I closed up the window on the right side of the guest bedroom, and how we handled the exterior after closing up that window.

If you missed those details, here’s the quick recap of how we closed up our window and handled it on the exterior.

On our house, the solution was pretty straightforward. The window we closed up was on the side of an area that juts out from the front of the house, but the window was on the side and wasn’t really visible from the front of the house.

That view now looks like this, with the window closed up and a closet in that space…

guest bedroom progress - 3

Th exterior of our house in that area is stone, so removing that window left a big hole in the stone…

window closed up on the exterior

So we had two stonemasons use some of our leftover stone (that we saved after having it removed from another area) to fill in that hole…

window filled in with stone

And then after I pressure washed, primed, and painted that stone, it blended right in. You’d never know there was a window there.

window removed and filled in with stone

So having been through this process myself, I assure Karen that she could absolutely remove a window, fill it in with brick, and it would work out perfectly! Then she sent me pictures, and I realized that her situation isn’t quite as straightforward as mine.

Karen and her husband have been working hard on the remodel of the interior of the house, and they’re about to tackle the exterior. Here’s how the house looks right now…

Reader question - Karen's house - 1

And the window in question is the one on the far left…

Reader question - Karen's house - 2

And for context, here’s the other end of the house. There’s a carport, an open area, and then a separate little apartment on the far right that they plan to turn into an office.

Reader question - Karen's house - 3

They weren’t able to add on to the back of the house in order to add on rooms that they needed because of the placement of the septic system. So they had to work with the original footprint of the house and reconfigure the existing rooms.

They combined two bedrooms, took out the tiny master bath, and turned that area into a master suite with a large bedroom, master bathroom, and walk-in closet. The problem is that front left window is now split between the shower in the master bathroom and the master closet. So the entire window isn’t even just in one room, which makes it even more of a challenge.

The entire exterior will eventually be painted Repose Gray to make everything cohesive, but Karen would like to decide how to handle this window first.

So if this were yours, how would you handle it? Keep the window for the exterior symmetry, but just drywall right over it on the interior? And if you do that, what do you do about the view through the window?

Or would you toss the symmetry aside, brick over it, and handle it a different way? And if you do that, do you sacrifice symmetry? Or is there another way you can think of to preserve that symmetry?

If you have any ideas that may help Karen solve this problem, please share!



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106 Comments

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    DAYLE STOFFERAHN
    August 13, 2020 at 10:58 am

    She could leave the window on the outside and paint the inside of the glass black. That way the inside of the glass would never need washing and it would look like it’s dark in that room all the time. Then insulate and drywall over it on the inside.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Adrienne
      August 13, 2020 at 11:46 am

      Great idea.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Joanne
        August 13, 2020 at 12:23 pm

        She could take off the brick and side it to match the rest of the siding

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Carol
          August 13, 2020 at 4:21 pm

          That was my thought. The house would even look more up-to-date with brick on only the central portion.

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Deb
          August 13, 2020 at 7:32 pm

          Remove the brick on that wall, and replace the remaining window with one that is bigger to help balance it, adding vegetation to help further with balance.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Dianr
        August 13, 2020 at 1:35 pm

        What a dilemma! I would remove both windows so no windows on that exposed front. I would have brick go all the way across from edge to edge so it matches the main house or go with all siding, maybe a nice cedar, that could be duplicated elsewhere on the front facade. I

        I would definitely add windows on each side exterior wall -that doesn’t face the street. Natural lightis so nice to have,
        even in a closet. If it is in the bathroom, you could add a high horizontal window that wpuld add light & provide privacy.

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Sheila R Felix
          August 13, 2020 at 2:16 pm

          I would brick half way into each window. Replacing the current windows with stationary glass window on opposite ends. This would let light into each room (but not the shower) and the symmetry would remain stable with smaller windows.
          S. Felix

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Christine
        August 13, 2020 at 9:29 pm

        I would want to know what is under the center peak. Could those 2 windows be replaced with 1 long window like on the other side of house in the center, under the roof peak? It should displace enough brick to cover the existing window spots. That might be the most symmetrical and visually pleasing if it possible. But then again, it depends on where the room splits inside.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Rhonda
      August 13, 2020 at 12:32 pm

      A less expensive solution our neighbors used to cover windows that were no longer needed was to cover the windows with inoperable shutters which fit into the window opening.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Kristine Brown
        August 13, 2020 at 3:08 pm

        That is what I was thinking. Shutters placed there that are in the “closed” position. I see that all the time. Landscaping will also help to deter the eye and draw more attention to appropriately sized landscaping.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Becky Warner
        August 13, 2020 at 3:48 pm

        My idea as well.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Bev Jones
      August 13, 2020 at 4:59 pm

      We did this with mopey son’s house in the bathroom where we needed to put the tub and shower. Looks great from the outside and inside is tiled. No one is the wiser.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Susan
      August 13, 2020 at 5:33 pm

      Take out the window and remove the brick. Reside the front and then do some landscaping to help out with the symmetry.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Karen H
      August 13, 2020 at 10:05 pm

      This is pretty much what we decided to do… not paint on the inside glass, but plywood painted black, placed in the window insert and then walled over. Thank you!

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Lisa
        August 14, 2020 at 12:11 am

        How about close up the window on the left, and make the window on the right a little wider to the right. Cover the whole side with siding-forget the brick. Then cover the brick on the apartment, so then the focus will be on the center of the house where the entrance is, with all the brick there with the door and triple window. Landscaping can help fill in on the left and by the apartment. The lattice could Be changed a little too with a little color drawing focus near the center areas as well.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Susan Kuhn
    August 13, 2020 at 10:59 am

    I would remove the brick, put a new, larger window in the middle of that space, and put the brick where the 2 windows are now. Also update the front door — it’s very 70’s. (So is that lattice-looking stuff on the right. Replace with something else?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Barbara Hebert
      August 13, 2020 at 11:38 am

      This is exactly what I was thinking. I definitely would NOT fake it by drywalling over the window on the inside. Moisture (windows sweat), insulation, and many other issues would become problematic. And what happens if the glass breaks? Major issues. Probably the best answer is redesign the interior layout so the wall that is an issue is in a different location. The second best is what Susan Kuhn suggests above. Good luck!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Adele
      August 13, 2020 at 11:47 am

      I LOVE the front door and that it is 70’s! It suits the house.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Lisa Johnson
      August 13, 2020 at 12:10 pm

      I whole heartedly agree with Susan Kuhn! Then once it is painted all over, it will look so much better. It needs foundation plants also after the work has been done. And put a nice shape to the garden bed- curves to soften the linear aspect of the front.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Amanda
      August 13, 2020 at 5:14 pm

      Yes. If this is possible with the interior layout, I think this would maintain the integrity of the original house design.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    callie
    August 13, 2020 at 11:03 am

    That is tough! It’s a lot of blank brick without that window. My parent’s house has a window that was walled over; it just has a sheer curtain. From the outside, you cannot tell it is walled over. I even went searching for the window, convinced it was “real.”

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Judy DJ
    August 13, 2020 at 11:03 am

    What a great house! If you think about it, it is similar to yours, in a way.

    For the exterior, what if they continue the siding over the left window up until the middle of that front section and use the brick removed to add to the right side of the right window? (I did a very poor mock up, but don’t know how to add to comments to show.) There would still be symmetry with the wide open left area and the wide open right area, I think.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      August 13, 2020 at 11:31 am

      You can send me the picture and I’ll attach it. [email protected]

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kim May
      August 13, 2020 at 11:49 am

      How about bricking in both windows and putting in a large crescent window in over the brick. Not sure what the other window opens up to. If that wasn’t an option, I would brick it up! Lose the symmetry, but with a tall conifer at that end it wouldn’t be noticeable.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Vivian R.
      August 13, 2020 at 11:53 am

      I would close up the window and cover it with the siding on the front of the house, not brick. To bring back the balance or symmetry, I would place a vertical fan-shaped trellis there with some kind of climbing vine on it.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Rachel Richardson
        August 13, 2020 at 3:16 pm

        Agree Vivian. That way they keep their layout inside and potentially stop and problems other the fake window

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      florence fixx
      August 13, 2020 at 12:04 pm

      this is exactly the way i was thinking as it would become more striking and actually more balanced as one sees it full front view …… then at some point ,if preferred, they could do that technique over the bricks to enhance the entire home ……. way to go Judy ….

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Susie Longwell
        August 13, 2020 at 5:05 pm

        Thank you for the picture. I agree, the window needs to be covered with siding, then brick the right side of the window that is close to the porch. I would also brick the “lattice” looking stuff by the carport, then put siding on part of the brick on the end of the office. That way the brick is In the middle, connecting the house and it’s framed on the outside ends with siding.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Athena
    August 13, 2020 at 11:09 am

    This won’t help but I would have planned all interior work around that window. Whether they meant reconfiguring the closet and bath or getting smaller versions or adding a window in the closet or whatever. Sometimes your house has limitations that don’t make all of the remodel options you’d like available to you and you have to switch things up. I would have either pre-planned how to redo the front window of I was dead set on nothaving it there (and probably would have hired that out like you did to ensure it blended well etc..) or changed where other things were so the window would be undisturbed. I don’t know that they have another good option. The could teplace both front windows there and put a larger one in the middle but then it syill might be in the way of interior remodel plans. That’s what would be best in my opinion. Otherwise I think they need to rethink their interior plans and redo if necessary.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Chris
      August 13, 2020 at 11:19 am

      Totally agree with you. Needs to be changed from the inside leaving the exterior as is. Don’t want to run the risk of a bandaid solution.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Peggy
    August 13, 2020 at 11:12 am

    I’m assuming they can’t take out both windows and put one larger one in the center? If that is a possibility, wouldn’t that be more symetrical with the right side of the house?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Heather Gillett
      August 13, 2020 at 11:19 am

      I was going to ask that as well? Is this the master and would they want a larger window there?

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Patricia
        August 13, 2020 at 1:00 pm

        Rather then going dark on the window you could go light and have a light source behind the glass with blinds .
        Nothing. Wrong with the front door or the brick – embrace the 70 ‘s !

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jessica DeMotte
      August 13, 2020 at 11:24 am

      This is the idea I had, to reconfigure that whole section, removing both windows and replacing with one that is centered on the exterior wall, in a similar style to the one on right. They’d lose the red brick look on that left side, but I don’t think the house would be unbalanced if they paint the brick on the little attached apartment white (or change that out for siding instead). That scenario would leave the center section with the front door with the brick still, but it would be a focal point. If it were my house, I’d also take out that long section of lattice work near the garage. If that provides privacy then I’d go back in with maybe long cedar planks or even painted slats rather than the lattice.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Andrea
      August 13, 2020 at 11:28 am

      Take them both out and put in three. They could be high (almost like a transom window) for privacy in the bathroom area, if the bedroom area has another window on the side.
      But it would definitely embrace a more mid century look.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jayne Finkbohner
      August 13, 2020 at 11:31 am

      I say take both windows out and large new window for symmetry.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    HopeJW
    August 13, 2020 at 11:20 am

    I suggest taking that window out and putting, if possible, 3 windows. That way each room has a front yard view.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Emily Hoffman
      August 13, 2020 at 12:08 pm

      I would add a doorway from the bathroom to the closet that is open on the window side. Then add a barn style door to the opening.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Erin
      August 13, 2020 at 12:58 pm

      I’m going to take a different perspective. I’m assuming these people are doing most themselves, and have a limited budget. Rather than keeping balance on the left side of the house, I would actually solve the problem by achieving a “balance” of sorts with a window that matches the larger picture window near the front door. So, taking out the left window altogether and putting a larger picture window in place of the remaining one on the right. It must match the middle picture window. The remaining Left side wall would absolutely need careful landscaping too. Just my two cents.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Pam
    August 13, 2020 at 11:20 am

    I had to do this once and I painted the window black on the inside . Then you can finish the inside however is needed. But , make sure to water proof the window . I do not think it would look good bricking it up from the outside . But , if I was forced to do that , I would grow tall plants there to hide that part of the house .

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Diane mansil
    August 13, 2020 at 11:23 am

    Remove window and brick in the space, then paint the brick white to match the siding and the cinder block wall further down. Add color with plantings against the all white house. Something taller where the window used to be would offset the lack of symmetry.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jennifer
      August 13, 2020 at 11:33 am

      Agree with this take. Baffling how people value exterior symmetry (for strangers!) over interior functionality for the daily inhabitants.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Heidi
        August 13, 2020 at 12:33 pm

        I agree with you wholeheartedly Jennifer! We put in several new basement windows a couple of years ago, and had to work around our front door porch and the rooms configurations we had planned in the basement, and so we couldn’t line the basement windows up “properly” with the upstairs windows, so I guess it could be argued now that the outside of our house looks kind of funny. But we needed more light in the basement as well as egress windows because that’s where all our bedrooms are, so I couldn’t really care less if people driving by notice that our house isn’t symmetrical.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Terrillr
    August 13, 2020 at 11:26 am

    What are the plans for the exterior, do they like the brick, is there enough in the budget to remove the brick?

    If I had the funds, I would remove the brick and windows, replacing with a larger window (depending on the room placement). Otherwise, the suggestion of a matching window treatment (curtains, drapes, blinds, shades) to be seen from the outside and blocked off from the inside would be my best solution.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Brenda Zanga
    August 13, 2020 at 11:29 am

    I am leaning the way Peggy is above. If at all possible, try to match the left side of the house with the right side – even if it means making the window and the brick areas smaller. So there would be one center window with the red brick on each side in the center of the left side. Unless, it’s not too late to change the interior, then I would most likely rethink the interior to work with the exterior.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jo
    August 13, 2020 at 11:30 am

    Put the same window covering as the right hand window. Then do the drywall on the inside and proceed with the bath.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Chris
    August 13, 2020 at 11:32 am

    Is it possible to just “scoot” the 2 windows flanking the brick over? So there is a gap between the window and the brick on both sides. Would that allow the window to be fully in the closet? If the closet is large enough, the lighting might be nice. If not, I liked the suggestion of painting the inside of the window black and/or adding a window covering and blocking the inside wall.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Linda Spangenberg
      August 13, 2020 at 12:38 pm

      Chris, I think you’re onto something. I think the window symmetry should be maintained, and there are several options, depending on what works with the inside floorplan:
      –One large centered window
      –Two windows, one in master closet (I have a window in my walk-in closet, and I love it), and the other spaced evenly from the opposite wall.
      –Three windows, evenly spaced out (like Andrea suggested)
      –Four windows (one in master closet, one in shower), evenly spaced out.

      There are significant costs in choosing a balanced architectural configuration, but it will enhance the home’s value. I agree with Barbara about the inadvisability of drywalling over the unused window from the inside. When I’ve chosen the easy and convenient fix, it’s always come back to bite me later. Good luck, and please, we’d love to see another photo when it’s all done!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    El
    August 13, 2020 at 11:33 am

    I would do as Peggy suggested if possible to put a large centered window, but without knowing what the limitations are on the inside it is hard to suggest anything. I would if at all look at keeping the window if a large centered window isn’t a possibility and I would not drywall over it and just keep the window on the outside due to potential condensation issues.

    Can the interior design be re-worked to help achieve a pleasing interior and exterior?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Carolyn Harper
    August 13, 2020 at 11:33 am

    I think they need to hire a designer/architect for this one. The house is sooooooo long that symmetry is crucial. Spend money up front to get the right plan for this house and do the project in phases if their money is tight. You don’t want to bungle the curb appeal and never be able to sell the house in the future.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Teckla
    August 13, 2020 at 11:33 am

    I would remove/cover the window. Is it possible to enlarge the window next to it for better proportion? If so, I’d do that. I’m not a fan of brickwork; I’d try to remove/camouflage it across the front of the house, or if that’s not possible, perhaps balance it somehow on the proposed office wall. Just my 2 cents worth.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Connie
    August 13, 2020 at 11:40 am

    I was remodeling and needed to remove a window in a bedroom but I wanted the exterior to stay the same. I used window film on the inside of the glass before studs and insulation were added. You cannot tell that it’s not really a window from the outside of the house!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Adele
    August 13, 2020 at 11:45 am

    Where I live, this is called a gable-ell design. The gable end is where the bedroom is. The ell is the section to the right. My suggestions may be more renovation than they want, but here goes:

    1) Carefully remove both the left window and the brick from the gable. Assuming the window is in good shape, move it next to the other window for a large bank. Otherwise, replace with two new windows.

    2) Vertical board-and batten that section of the house.

    3) Install a large trellis, climbing ivy, or other plantings on the left half of gable end to cover, distract, and balance. I would definitely consult a landscape designer for this!

    4) Use the salvaged brick (probably mixed with new brick) to cover the lower part of the picture window wall. Best option would be to paint the brick the same color as the gable end of the house.

    5) Leave the inset porch natural brick and paint the door something bright. If you decide you don’t like it, paint that brick too.

    6) Remove siding and board-and-batten the car port. Ditto with the office. I can’t tell if the upper wall is brick; is so either remove and install some windows or paint the same color as the board-and-batten.

    7) Landscape, landscape, landscape!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Sherre
    August 13, 2020 at 11:49 am

    I think they need to keep the symmetry. The one window in the center sounds good, but would that work? Sounds like they might end up with a giant window either in a bathroom or a closet. Symmetry doesn’t necessarily mean identical, it just means balanced. If they kept the rough opening the same, but did a different treatment in there, it would probably look balanced. What about taking that interior wall, translating it to the exterior in the opening, and then doing two small windows (glass block/obscure glass in shower, small window for light in closet)? Or, if a window in the shower makes you feel like an exhibitionist, maybe just do a small window in the closet, and inset the bathroom side to keep the look of symmetry, and do something creative (a panel, lattice, etc) that would stay true to the house’s style? Hard to say without knowing exactly where the interior wall falls, but if you could just mimic the symmetry with some feature, I think it would work! (FYI, I had a window in my shower. I DID feel like an exhibitionist, and it also caused severe water damage in my walls. If you opt to do one, make sure you flash it in properly :))

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Missy
    August 13, 2020 at 11:52 am

    Not related to the design at all, but I like how we’re dealing with reader’s quandries; I know I’ve had plenty of my own, and it’s nice knowing I’m not the only one! Would be nice to do on a regular basis!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Sherre
      August 13, 2020 at 12:53 pm

      I agree, Missy! I have a quandary in my living room with a fireplace that takes up too much space. Can I send in photos and get some opinions as well? 😉

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jayme
    August 13, 2020 at 11:55 am

    I would probably replace the window with two smaller ones (that are the same height as the current window).
    a column of brick between them (so that they do not intersect with the interior walls) could help preserve the symmetry of the current look, but make it more functional.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Betsy Nickel
      August 13, 2020 at 1:43 pm

      I was thinking just the same thing! Having a window in the bathroom and one in the closet is perfect for free lighting. If that is a scene that should not be “shared”, a window film or stained glass panel would work fine. It would add an unexpected detail that designers look for.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Cindy
    August 13, 2020 at 11:56 am

    I would brick it over, then maybe add some landscaping to “add back: the symmetry.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Deb
    August 13, 2020 at 11:56 am

    The ideal solution is getting rid of the both windows and putting one in the middle. Another option would be to completely close in the one on the left, interior and exterior and then make the one on the right longer vertically–and to make it look proper, could cut in another window on the wall just around the corner, so you have a corner of windows that look like they belonged there.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    suzanne
    August 13, 2020 at 11:58 am

    The window next to the front door isn’t exactly symmetrical. Could they replace the window with a narrower window and brick the closet part up If they don’t want to center the window on the brick? If budgets tight just brick or wood side the window and let landscaping pull the heavy work. A modern trellis with a tidy vine would work wonders.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jenny Hartfelder
      August 13, 2020 at 12:01 pm

      I think I’d remove the brick entirely from that section of the house and do what they need to with removing the window. Yes, they might have just one off center window, but without the brick, it won’t highlight it.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    florence fixx
    August 13, 2020 at 12:04 pm

    this is exactly the way i was thinking as it would become more striking and actually more balanced as one sees it full front view …… then at some point ,if preferred, they could do that technique over the bricks to enhance the entire home ……. way to go Judy ….

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Pam
    August 13, 2020 at 12:24 pm

    The house does not have symmetry already with 2 windows on the left and one on the right. Can they match by putting a similar size window in the middle of the left size?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Judy
    August 13, 2020 at 12:37 pm

    There was an episode of Bargain Mansions (the most recent season) where Tamara Day covered a window to maintain symmetry. It was, however on the second floor of a house where it might not be noticeable. Her solution was a bit more involved than just painting the interior glass black. The result was successful.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Chris
    August 13, 2020 at 12:54 pm

    It’s difficult to make any suggestion since we don’t have an interior layout or a budget. I’d be inclined to move the window to center it in whatever is at the outer corner of the house and extend the brick all the way across the front. I’ve emailed a mock up to you, Kristi. Not a good one because the photos don’t show the left corner of the house but I’ve tried.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Martha Fenstermacher
    August 13, 2020 at 12:59 pm

    It seems as though their interior renovations are done, and the window placement wasn’t addressed at that time. I’d take out the window, drywall inside, brick outside, paint the exterior of the house, and plant something tall in the previous window area to provide an illusion of symmetry. Cheapest solution!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Cindyjean
    August 13, 2020 at 1:00 pm

    I love the house, and it’s retro look. Since you mentioned what it is currently on the inside, sounds like the work is done on the inside, so only consideration is how to deal outside. I think it would be great if the window were removed and replaced by siding or brick, since it’s all going to be painted the same colour anyway. Once that’s done, to balance that end of the house, maybe a small feature could be added to incorporate a trellis or even the pattern of the blocks on the carport section. It could be incorporated into the landscaping at the front so it is part of the house but maybe not attached, to give the illusion of balance, without symmetry, and could be changed out easily in future if a bigger exterior remodel became necessary or desired. In any case, I see the potential, and think the house is lovely in it’s retro vintage charm.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Margie E
    August 13, 2020 at 1:01 pm

    My vote is brick over the window they don’t want, and add a third pane of glass to the other window so it mirrors the front window only smaller, and ignore the asymmetry. I’ve tried walling behind a window and it did not hold up. Sweating glass caused issues for us. We put the window back and re-configured the bathroom.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Chelle Ellis
    August 13, 2020 at 1:01 pm

    I’d want to keep symmetry, so I’d put a blind on it to be seen from the outside and wall it up from the inside.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jen
      August 13, 2020 at 1:24 pm

      I’m sure this will be unpopular but oh Karen, move the wall! Don’t turn one mistake into two.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Shannon
    August 13, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    I added a window for a symmetric look from the outside, but it was in the back of a closet inside. So instead of opening up the drywall just to expose a view of clothes from the outside, I left the closet wall intact, stapled black fabric on the back of the window and put it in from the outside. Does that make sense? So I would do the same with this house, and drywall over it on the inside.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Donna T
    August 13, 2020 at 1:19 pm

    If they want the house to have the mid-century vive like the front door and car port brick work they could move the window to the right and have two of the same size or one bigger. Give up the symmetry and do something interesting on the left such as a trellis or vertical siding accent. I don’t think it is that noticeable on such a long house.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jill H
    August 13, 2020 at 1:29 pm

    What does the window on the right go to? Bedroom?
    I am all about symmetry on a house but I would not match the large window in the front as those are used for livingrooms etc. Someone mentioned taking out both windows and adding 3 windows evenly spaced, which i agree with. I would also do the the same thing on the detached ‘office’ installing 3 windows evenly spaced to bring symmetry to the entire house. Especially if all will be painted Repose Gray to be cohesive.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Julia
    August 13, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    I would want to eliminate the brick and siding fighting each other for attention. Wood cedar shingles might be pretty on the triangular top above the windows (And then repeated in other areas) with just siding on the bottom. A design element in place of the missing window might provide some symmetry. A fake window can be added. I would not leave the current one but use an overlay window is possible. In the end, it would just be decor. (Heres a quick video on that. ). https://youtu.be/i8woCI1s1b4 I think one of the big problems is that there is so much going on in the entire front of the house. Simplifying and updating elements will help a lot!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Pearl
    August 13, 2020 at 1:45 pm

    Please let us know what the homeowner decides. There are so many interesting options here!!

    Thank you!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Crystal
    August 13, 2020 at 2:06 pm

    I would be inclined to remove both windows and some of the brick in between. Then install some very narrow (12″) non-opening windows about 6-8″ apart. That could solve the closet/shower issue. If a majority ended up on one side or the other, it wouldn’t be noticeable. Measurements are quite variable depending on where the wall lands inside.
    I had a house that had a larger window in the tub/shower area. I was young and dumb. Today, I would hang a clear or frosted shower curtain over that whole wall so no water ever hit the window. Having a full shower curtain over the back or end wall of the shower would also cut down on cleaning. A white nylon curtain would work too and can be washed, plus pulled back for light in the BR.
    I currently have 2 sets of windows that are embedded in exterior walls. Didn’t bother me a bit to cover those puppies up when we remodeled. Windows in a brick veneer house are hard to get out when they’re up high and you’re down low on a downward slope from the house.
    Obviously, the cheapest idea is to make the window “fake” with the black paint & drywall but only if the window is double-paned. Otherwise condensation will ruin that wall. Personally, I hope they are just in the planning stage because changing a plan on paper is the cheapest way to go.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Vivian
    August 13, 2020 at 2:16 pm

    Combining a few of the ideas from previous posts… if it works with the interior layout, replace the right side window with a larger one. Doesn’t have to be as big as the picture window by the porch, but bigger is better. Remove the left window and remove all the brick in this front section of the house and replace it with board and batten. Also remove the brick in the far right section(new office area) And do the same board and batten in its place. The only remaining brick would be front porch and picture window area. I would also remove the lattice and if you want the screening effect the lattice allowed, replace it with vertical stands, giving it a similar look To the board and batten (Except see through, instead of solid). The board and batten would help give some verticleness to a very long house. I’m assuming they don’t want to spend the money to change rooflines to break things up

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Bonnie Walker
      August 13, 2020 at 3:29 pm

      I would remove the brick from that section. It’s not needed and only for design. replace with the same style wood siding. I would keep all the other brick, just paint it all one color.

      remove the small bathroom/bedroom window. Replace the other window with a larger window that is more centered.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Diana K. Berg
    August 13, 2020 at 2:23 pm

    The exterior of this home doesn’t show which style or type of home it is. I would determine was style I wanted to play up on the exterior. Then I would research features of that style and add fencing, moldings, trellises, shutters, decorative element under the peak, changing the material on the top part of the wall above the window (not all of these things) based on the style. It doesn’t take much to change the look and feel of a home’s exterior. Verticals stained wood is often used for modern homes and playing up horizontal elements. Once that’s decided I would use those elements to reconfigure the front area. One example would be putting a wooden trellis where the window Is currently. That part of the house is an opportunity to give the house character other than just painting it. I also love the idea of changing the window on the right to a larger window or a French door with a wooden pergola along this entire section of house.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Bonnie Walker
      August 13, 2020 at 3:30 pm

      love this idea of a trellis and ‘garden’ in the front.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Brenda
    August 13, 2020 at 3:50 pm

    I would remove the siding and both windows. I would then install patio doors centred on the right side of the wall. I would then reuse the excess brick to fill in the space from the left window. In fact I would make that area a beautiful garden with a flagstone base and a cute bistro set for relaxing outside. Doors don’t have to be patio. They could be folding doors, French doors etc. Making a small Oasis would off set the symmetry.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Claudia
    August 13, 2020 at 3:56 pm

    Take the windows out and put in skylights.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Kathy
    August 13, 2020 at 4:01 pm

    Some show on HGTV ( I think it is redoing old mansions – a daughter and her dad) painted plywood black and put it in the window and covered over it from the inside with sheet rock. It worked perfectly for making the inside work and keeping the outside symmetry.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Karen H
      August 13, 2020 at 9:56 pm

      This is exactly what we opted to do! Good to know others have done it and that it worked!! Thank you!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Carol
    August 13, 2020 at 4:24 pm

    I would take off the brick from that part of the house. Remove and add windows where needed, then side it the same from top to bottom. The brick on the other part of the house will still work to keep that 70s ranch vibe.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Amber Jones
    August 13, 2020 at 4:56 pm

    Here’s my two cents: I would first remove all the bricks on the main part of the house (problem window area and front window area). Fill in the problem window area, but make the adjacent window bigger, maybe twice a big, with a prominent frame to make it more of a focal point. Then put new siding over the whole front and paint the brick on the Other side of the carport to match.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Ritta Cunningham
    August 13, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    I would eliminate the brick and replace with all siding while removing the window on the left. Then I would put a wider right window in. Then landscape with taller bushes on the left or and ornamental tree and smaller plants under the remaining window.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lulu
    August 13, 2020 at 5:03 pm

    Suggestion A: remove left window. Wall over on the inside as needed for shower and closet; on the exterior close up and add a fixed shutter to balance other window. Add shutters to other front facing windows.

    Suggestion B: move both windows; under that gable center the two windows; on either side, add brick or siding.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Krista
    August 13, 2020 at 5:03 pm

    If you look at the window on the right of the front door it isn’t centered (or doesn’t appear to be to me) So I would take out the window properly, replace siding etc and then I would add some brick to the right of the window that remains so it looks similar to the side of the house to the right of the door.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Mairim
    August 13, 2020 at 5:08 pm

    I’d rather more light than less. So I would removed some of the brick and current windows and do four smaller windows, evenly spaced: two in whatever right hand room, one in closet and one in bathroom. Our house had all the basement windows closed off by previous owners. There’s no natural light in the finished basement. From the outside I think the blocked windows also looks strange.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Shannon
    August 13, 2020 at 5:10 pm

    Bargain Mansions on HGTV did something similar to a house on their show. To keep the symmetry of drywall the interior.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jena
    August 13, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    I would argue that symmetry isn’t as important as balance. I would remove the window and carry brick all the way to the edge of the wall similar to the other front wall of the house to the right of the front door. It will read as one band that wraps around the front of the house and I don’t think you would even miss the window.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Marianne in Mo.
    August 13, 2020 at 6:57 pm

    I’m confused. Is the window to the right a part of the subject bedroom suite, and she needs to lose just the left window? Can she also lose the other window and put in a larger, or double window centered in the space where the bricks are? If the left window is the only one to be dealt with, I would black out that window by covering the interior with black painted drywall or plywood and leave the window in place. Keep the balance outside.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Danielle Barse
    August 13, 2020 at 7:24 pm

    I would remove the window, brick or side over the old opening and then hang something “architectural” looking that was similar in size to the other window. Around here we have barn quilts, but a large wooden medallion or metal, to even things out.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Karen H
    August 13, 2020 at 9:15 pm

    This is Karen from Kristi’s post. Thank you so much to all of you who responded with your wonderfully creative ideas. Because so many of you suggested removing the two windows and replacing it with one larger window, I will tell you that the window in question is now partly in the shower and partly in the walk-in closet. And the other front window is in another bedroom. Trust me when I tell you this whole layout was thoroughly thought through before any of the work was begun. There are so many windows in the house… three of the four bedrooms each had two good sized windows in them. And as much as I would have enjoyed a window beaming all that beautiful natural light into the closet, because we are downsizing from 2,500 sq to about 1,700 sf, I need the closet space more. So no matter what we option we chose, we were going to lose a window. Just around the corner on the left side of the house, there is an even bigger window… that is our master bathroom and there is tons of natural light coming in, which I love. We will be frosting that window, however, so the neighbors don’t get a peep show! 🙂

    For those of you who mentioned the “lattice”… that is cement block and will definitely be staying. On the other side of that is a large porch (enclosed on three sides) that opens to the pool. That open “lattice” design allows for a cross breeze, which I know we will appreciate here in Florida.

    Oh, and one more thing… the front door is being replaced, as is every single door in the house. I do not care for that door at all. This house was built in 1950, but I think that door may have been replaced at some time along the way. Anyway, it goes.

    At this point, the new master suite has been framed and dry walled, but that area is still open because the shower has not yet been tiled. I know many of you will disagree with our choice, but because of our limited options, we have decided to keep the window, black it out and enclose the shower as normal. (And no, we are not doing this work ourselves.) I will be using landscaping to hopefully distract from the window being blacked out. On the other end of the house (where the apartment is), since there is no window, we will be adding some kind of trellis or something to break up that wall of brick.

    Thank you again for all your suggestions and thank you to Kristi for posting my dilemma on her blog! I truly appreciate it all!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Pearl
      August 15, 2020 at 7:51 am

      Hey Karen!!

      Thank you for replying!! I was so hoping to find out what your decisions would be!

      I have not read through every idea above, but there are some wonderful ones! What a creative bunch of people.

      Has anyone suggested putting up shutters on the house? You could put closed shutters over this window. Then you could put closed shutters on the little room at the other end of the house where the expanse of brick is to break it up.

      Anyway, just what you need, another suggestion!!!

      Thanks for sharing your house dilemma with us!! It was fun seeing this and watching it get resolved.

      💗

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Courtney
    August 14, 2020 at 5:00 am

    I would re-glaze the window with mirror glass.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Shauna Steadman
    August 14, 2020 at 6:37 am

    Reglaze the left side window areas with glass block. Add a pergola on the outside of the house that ends with the gable peak and whose roof line falls a bit below the house roof line. Put in vertical slat wall structure on the pergola sides adjacent to the left side and front, but open on the right side. With a patio floor (cement or tile, etc. ).
    Plant wisteria or hops for a climbing vine over the pergola, add outdoor furniture. Keep the front door. it’s classic, pump up the color.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    jenw
    August 14, 2020 at 9:49 am

    Is it possible to remove both windows and put in a large single window, centered in the brick? Coordinating with the living room windows?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Dom
      August 14, 2020 at 10:51 am

      I agree with this post. It would resemble the other window to the right of the front door. Have a center window and reuse the brick and flank both sides of the new window with the brick. If a new large window cannot be put in then a medium size one would look better than no window.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Stacye
    August 14, 2020 at 2:31 pm

    Would it be possible to remove both windows and put a larger window where the brick is. I’m a symmetrical girl so I don’t think you can remove the window on the left and fill in with siding. That will leave the window on the right looking like a mistake.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Phoebe
    August 14, 2020 at 7:20 pm

    Well, maybe both the windows can be removed, and a bigger window that is symmetric to the window on the other side of the main entrance could be created?

    If the window to the right belongs to the new bedroom that was two rooms merged into one, it could probably suit the interior as well (if not, what is behind that window and the rest of the wall anyway? It probably makes a difference)…

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Destiny
    August 16, 2020 at 5:31 pm

    skinnier window to the left and then enlarge window on the right. keep the brick if they are keeping it in the rest of them home. then use landscaping for more balance. I think if the one on the left is about 1/2 its current width and the other is 1.5x its current width, although unbalanced will look good still.

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