Breakfast Room

Dining Table Goals

One more day. I swear to you, I just need one more day to finish the trim and walls in the breakfast room. I was sure I could get it finished yesterday, but that tiny room has a ton of trim! It took all afternoon just to get one coat of paint on all of the trim. I went back and did the second coat of paint on the trim on the window wall (the wall with the most trim) and then painted the first coat of paint on door last night before I went to bed, so I’m 95% sure that I can get a second coat on the rest of the trim, and the get the walls painted today.

In the meantime, I’ve had a few people ask me what dining table I’ll be using in the breakfast room (I shared it a few posts back), and how I plan to refinish it. I’ll be using this round dining table that I found on Craigslist a couple of years ago…

…but my breakfast room isn’t too terribly big, and right now it’s looking so light and airy, so the last thing I want in there is a really dark, heavy-looking table right in the center of the room.

I really have no idea what kind of wood is underneath all of that heavy stain, so once I figure that out, I might find that my options are limited a bit. But that hasn’t stopped me from looking and dreaming about exactly how I’d love that table to look in the breakfast room.

My favorite inspiration so far is this table makeover from Bless’er House. Lauren started out with a table that looked like this, with a heavy looking stained finish…

dining table makeover from Bless'er house - table before with heavy, dark stained finish

…and she turned it into this…

dining table makeover from Bless'er house - table after

That wood top is absolute perfection, and she used Minwax Weathered Oak stain to achieve that look. I don’t want to paint my base. I want the entire table the same color, and if could achieve that look on my whole table, I’d be one happy DIYer. Click here to check out more of Lauren’s process and more pictures of her beautiful refinished table.

I also love this table makeover from Paint Me White. Sandy started with this table with a dark, heavy stained finish on it…

dining table makeover from Paint Me White - table before with heavy, dark stained finish

…and transformed it into this with a whitewash on the wood top…

dining table makeover from Paint Me White - table after with whitewashed wood top

Check out more pictures of Sandy’s table makeover here.

And finally, I also love the look of the stained top on this table makeover from Orphans With Makeup. Mary also started out with a dark stained table…

dining table makeover from Orphans With Makeup - table before with heavy dark stained finish

…and she transformed it into this, with a lovely lightly stained top…

dining table makeover from Orphans With Makeup - table after with light wood top and painted base

Click here to see more of Mary’s process and after pics.

So that’s my goal. I want it to look like a wood table, but I don’t want any dark, heavy stain. Let’s just hope I have more success with this dining table than I did with the last one I tried to paint/refinish. Five times. (Was it five? Heck, I lost count!) 😀



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27 Comments

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Carol Fraley
    February 16, 2017 at 9:10 am

    My only thought is, can Matt get his wheelchair under the table? Those legs look like it might be hard for him to get up to the table all the way. Love the idea for the table!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Susan
    February 16, 2017 at 9:13 am

    Funny, this is not a comment about your table at all, but the picture of your table shows your music room before the bookcases and it looks so much narrower than it does with the bookcases. Good choice adding the bookcases. I am definitely one of your readers that enjoys your journey and hearing about the ideas that didn’t end up working and seeing an even better finished product in the end.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Adele
    February 16, 2017 at 9:18 am

    Dollars to donuts the wood is oak. It could be quarter sawn on top or it might just be veneer (probable on the sides and pedestal). I have a similar table and have seen many of them over the years. Use care when stripping and especially when sanding.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Kate
    February 16, 2017 at 9:31 am

    Yep…
    Five times… at least 😉

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Joyce
    February 16, 2017 at 9:35 am

    I bought a table just like yours years ago at an antique auction. Mine came with 5 leaves, so it becomes very long when needed. The one I have has 2 extra legs folded up under the tabletop that can be put down to stablize each end of the table when extended to its’ longest. Mine is definitely oak and oak veneer and I bet yours is too. I used Formby’s Furniture Refinisher to remove the dark finish.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Carol
    February 16, 2017 at 9:36 am

    I would have thought, by the look of the feet, that this is mahogany, which hurts my heart to think of it being stripped, but to each her own. 🙂

    My thought, looking through the inspiration pictures, was that, even lightened, I bet your table is still going to be too heavy for you. The inspiration tables are all more open–thinner legs, thinner table top, etc.

    Well, that’s why I love your blog: I have my thoughts and then I get too see your process and results, and it is all so interesting and educational!

    Anxiously awaiting your next post!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jenny
    February 16, 2017 at 9:40 am

    I couldn’t help but notice all the table transformations had the base and legs painted white and whether it highlights the contrast to the weathered wood look you are trying to achieve. Loved all the transformations. Looking forward to the finished product and the journey getting there.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Maureen
    February 16, 2017 at 9:41 am

    I just want to point out ALL the tables you like have a wood top and painted bottom.

    I so admire your SPEED and ability to tackle any and everything. And more than once!! You are an inspiration to me.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    AliceB
    February 16, 2017 at 10:04 am

    Hi Kristi! I’ve been reading your blog for years. I love everything you do.
    I think your plan for the table is perfect. Here’s a link to one that actually doesn’t have the bottom painted white. http://www.homestoriesatoz.com/diy/how-to-refinish-a-table.html
    I thought you might want to read how she did hers. She didn’t strip it all the way down to bare wood and it’s gorgeous.
    I can’t wait to see your room when it’s finished.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Theresa P
      February 16, 2017 at 10:33 am

      Great find! It looks like exactly what Kristi is trying to achieve!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Carol
    February 16, 2017 at 10:21 am

    Hi. About 3 years ago? you did a table that was round, and you sanded part of the white off and left a cool grain exposed. What happened to that table Kristi?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      February 16, 2017 at 10:26 am

      I still have it. The style of the table is just too country for my breakfast room.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Carla from Kansas
        February 16, 2017 at 10:38 am

        Is it the legs or the apron or what that makes you feel it is too country? The finish is so pretty.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Marlyn
        February 16, 2017 at 6:57 pm

        I was going to say the same thing. I really remember how pretty the top was. Are you sure it won’t work? You could at least try it. I also agree with checking out the wheelchair space.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Holly
    February 16, 2017 at 10:30 am

    I love the idea of making the table a lighter wood . I’m wondering if painting the bottom white will define it as more country looking. Just a thought. Love your blog. I stripped a pedestal table to cut down for a coffee table and left it bare wood for now. Wood is so warm and organic when it isn’t stained too dark or too orange.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Theresa P
    February 16, 2017 at 10:37 am

    I do love these tables! My only hesitation is that they look a little Joanna Gaines/Magnolia as compared to what you normally do. The first 2 pictures look like they could come from Fixer Upper. The 3rd one photo seems a little more like you. Anyway, it’s totally cool! Just a thought.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Deb
    February 16, 2017 at 11:09 am

    Wouldn’t the cerused oak table you did be more wheel chair friendly? Both tables are beautiful though.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Thelma L Hamilton
    February 16, 2017 at 12:18 pm

    Looking at the samples you shared, it really depends on what else is in the room that makes them “fit” or not. The white pitcher on the table or the other furniture really make a difference how the table color works to fit in or not. Thank you for making me realize that.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Linda
    February 16, 2017 at 12:26 pm

    Just my humble opinion of course, but your table looks really heavy (big) on the bottom pedestal…..is that going to fit in your small room and not overwhelm it? Without being painted white or something? Can’t wait to see what you do with it though.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Sue
    February 16, 2017 at 12:32 pm

    I’m sure the trim looks crisp and bright. Can’t wait to see the wall color. It’s interesting when you showed your table again I was thinking that a whitewash would relaly brighten it up. After seeing those examples I think that would be a good way to go. I also like the white base as it would look bright in that room as well. Go for it!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Theresa M
    February 16, 2017 at 2:13 pm

    I love your table and can’t wait to see how it turns out. I hope the wood cooperates and you get the finish you are after.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Michele
    February 16, 2017 at 2:50 pm

    It will be so exciting to get a piece of furniture in that breakfast room. I bet you are itching to get it done. I share the concern of others that the table you have has a very heavy looking bottom that seems to me too to be at odds with what you are trying to achieve for your breakfast room. Even painted white/off white, the pedestal and feet will be a heavy presence, harkening back to Victoriana. And I too think that is not the look you seem to be seeking. If you can’t find a good wood table with thinner more sculptural legs that also is not farmhouse chic, then perhaps you should consider a metal table with a glass top. I know you were looking for a table with a central pedestal for w/c access, but the right sized table should be suitable. Just my 2 cents.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Diane | An Extraordinary Day
    February 16, 2017 at 4:13 pm

    Kristi do you still have the table that you stripped and stained when you first moved to the house? I don’t remember the special process, but I do remember that is was pretty amazing and it was light. And wasn’t it a pedestal table?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Winnie
    February 16, 2017 at 6:42 pm

    I have to agree with everyone who commented on the “heavy” look of your table – especially the pedestal. Somehow I don’t see that working out in your breakfast room. But, you’ve surprised me before, so I look forward to seeing how this turns out.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Mary Vitullo
    February 17, 2017 at 11:16 am

    Thanks for the mention Kristi. I look forward to seeing it finished.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Shellley
    February 18, 2017 at 7:40 am

    I think a round table in the breakfast room is a great idea. It will be easier to maneuver around. There is something about a round table that is so pretty and it will be perfect in your light filled room.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    John Donovan
    March 3, 2017 at 1:02 pm

    These dining tables all look great! It goes to show you that even if your table doesn’t quite meet your expectations, you can make some changes yourself. Changing the stain can be challenging but it is worth the effort to get what you want.

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