Dining Room

Final Dining Table Decision (Plus, The Worst Product I’ve Ever Used)

Y’all, I’m about ready to pull my hair out over my stupid dining table. First, it was a green base with a stained top.

diy farmhouse dining table - stained top with dark green apron and legs - 2

That didn’t work, so I decided to go with a black base and a stained top.

dining table and chairs progress - black farmhouse table with green cane back chairs

That didn’t work, either. (Look how orange that wood top is!! Yikes!) So I decided to take a chance and try something a little different — white with some gold accents.

white and gold farmhouse table - 4

Nope. I really wanted stained wood. So I stripped that and tried staining it. Again.

dining table refinish - 3

That started off great, but the more I stained, the worse it got. First, I don’t care what type of stain or pre-stain conditioner, it never turns out like it’s supposed to. Either the color turns a funky color once it’s polyurethaned, or the color is splotchy and uneven. Second, once I decided not to use an area rug in the room, the stain on the part of the table that I had actually finished (just half of the top) clashed horribly with my hardwood floor, which has a lot of orange in it.

So this weekend, I decided to take my own advice and go in a whole different direction. I decided to go bold.

I decided to paint the thing teal.

It was a pretty easy and relaxing project, since I love to paint. I gave the whole table a quick sanding, following by a coat of oil-based primer. Then another quick sanding, and then I was ready to paint.

It turned out really pretty, but then the next day (yesterday) I decided that the top was going to need a clear coat for extra protection. So I bought some Minwax Polycrylic.

And that’s when I ruined my table.

I tried brushing it on. It dried so fast that there were brush strokes all over the place. I mean, it was AWFUL. So then I tried rolling it on with one of those skinny 6-inch rollers labeled for “smooth surfaces.” That resulted in the roughest, bumpiest table top ever. It looks like the entire surface has an orange peel texture, and the finish is also streaky and cloudy in areas.

teal painted dining table - 1

So now I have to sand the top….AGAIN!!!! I’m so unbelievably frustrated with this.

teal painted dining table - 2

I hate Minwax products. SO MUCH. Their stains are crappy and turn the wood splotchy, and now this.

And this isn’t my first time having this experience with Polycrylic. Remember when I painted my buffet black?

black buffet makeover - 1

Same thing happened then. I wanted to use a clear coat on the top to protect the painted finish. I tried brushing the Polycrylic, and it was streaky. I tried rolling it, and it was bumpy.

That was my first time using Polycrylic, so I thought maybe I just got a bad batch, or that the weather that day was having a horrible effect on it. So I dragged that heavy buffet out to my front porch, sanded the bumpy clear coat until it was smooth, and sprayed the Polycrylic on the top. EVEN THEN it turned out streaky and wouldn’t dry evenly!!! But again, I blamed it on the weather.

Then I used it on the dining table after I painted it white. Again, I couldn’t get it to cooperate with a brush or a roller, so I draped that entire side of the room with drop cloths, and sprayed the table top. And still, it turned out bumpy like orange peel. But again, I wrote it off to the weather.

Well, this is the third time I’ve used it, at a different time of the year, and with a brand new quart of Polycrylic, and it ruined my table. I suppose I could try dragging the heavy, bulky table outside to spray it. Or I could spend all that time and effort draping that side of the room in drop cloths again so I can spray it inside. But that would be a colossal waste of time and effort since I already know how that will turn out. Been there, done that.

I hate Minwax. So much. The only decent products they make are their oil-based polyurethanes, but that does me little good right now since oil-based polyurethanes turn yellow/orange.

Why, Lowe’s?! Why did you stop carrying Rust-Oleum wood stains and polyurethanes?! Those were the best!!!



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144 Comments

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    CB MacDuff
    July 18, 2016 at 8:20 am

    Is there a spray on that you could use. This way it would eliminate the brushes and rollers completely.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      CB MacDuff
      July 18, 2016 at 8:22 am

      Possibly in a spray can in the brand that you like? SOMEBODY must carry that RustOleum that you like — I’d totally pay extra for the product if found on the internet!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Joanne
    July 18, 2016 at 8:24 am

    Havery you tried General Finishes Gel stains and High Performance Top coats? They are no comparison whatsoever to Minwax.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Deb
    July 18, 2016 at 8:37 am

    Well the good news? The color is stunning. LOVE IT!. You could have a piece of non-glare glass cut to fit the table top and then put the little discs in between. Will need to wait until it’s very dry.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Carol Fraley
      July 18, 2016 at 9:51 am

      I agree the color is beautiful, but I don’t see it working in the dining room.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Nell
    July 18, 2016 at 8:38 am

    I think you’re problem might be using polyacrylic over oil base paint. Water base finishes applied over oil base finishes do not adhere correctly. Whether it’s paints, stains,sealers or floor finishes. Hope that helps

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 8:41 am

      I’m using latex paint, though. Not oil-based.

      Although you just gave me the answer to my problem! I need to have my color mixed in oil-based paint. That way, I can forgo the clearcoat altogether! I haven’t used oil-based paint in quite a while. It’s THE BEST, and I LOVE painting with it!

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Ann Marie @ Twice Lovely
        July 18, 2016 at 9:53 am

        I completely agree with the solution you’ve come to. Upgrade the paint either to an oil based (probably your best bet) or at the very least a water-based enamel product and skip the top-coat step all together. I prefer that whenever possible. Top coats are difficult!!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Carol
      July 18, 2016 at 4:16 pm

      I agree. I’ve used Polycrylic tons of times with no problems over chalk or acrylic paints.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Jane rathmanner
        December 20, 2017 at 7:42 am

        I am using polycrylic over chalk paint and am having the same problem that is stated above. I also was thinking it is old, but doesn’t souls like it makes a different. Why did it work on a couple cabinets, but not now?

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          sherry
          April 10, 2018 at 10:43 am

          The paint must be allowed to cure before applying the Polycrylic. If it isn’t allowed enough time to fully dry/cure then it will react with the paint and result in hazy or uneven results.

          • Reply To This Comment ↓
            Kristi
            April 10, 2018 at 10:54 am

            Seeing that latex paint takes two weeks to 30 days to fully cure, if what you’re saying is true, then that makes Polycrylic an even more useless product that I insinuated in this post. General Finishes clear coats are the best. No waiting an unreasonable amount of time, no streaky finishes, no hazy or uneven results, no clouding when they get wet, and they dry super hard and durable. I’ll never go back to Polycrylic.

            • Donna
              April 27, 2018 at 9:55 pm

              So..made my own chalk paint…kitchen cabinets look great. I applied one coat of acrylic polyurethane..showing streaks…open to any suggestions…I waited 6 days for paint to dry.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Dave
      February 11, 2017 at 4:11 pm

      With general finishes you can use the
      Waterbased products over oil stains. You just have to wait a minimum of 48 hours.😊

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Cindy
    July 18, 2016 at 8:39 am

    Maybe wax? Would protect with a soft sheen. Wouldn’t yellow…

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Justin
      July 18, 2016 at 12:32 pm

      I agree. Not the Annie Sloan stuff or the Annie-knock-off’s, but (believe it or not) the Minwax product (“Paste Finishing Wax”). When buffed with a drill-attachment buffer over whatever your base finish is (poly, paint, etc.) , it makes a glass-hard type coating that you wouldn’t believe can come from wax. I hand-rubbed the stuff on top of 4 coats of red latex (which takes notoriously long to cure) and we store stacks of plates, glasses, and all kinds of things on it and it’s never hurt the surface. And it’s not glossy.

      I know I’ve mentioned this before and you’re skeptical of the hardness of wax finishes. 🙂 Might be worth at least trying on a sample piece of wood, maybe for a future project if you’ve already headed out and had oil paint mixed.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jenn
    July 18, 2016 at 8:40 am

    Could it be because your putting a acrylic over something oil based? I have always been told to never mix the two.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 8:42 am

      I’m using it over latex paint.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Elisha
        July 21, 2016 at 4:16 pm

        What is the sheen of paint you are trying to coat? If is anything other than flat, the paint itself might be shedding off the water in your clear coat.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Jo B
        July 28, 2016 at 12:02 am

        You put down OIL based primer, then WATER based latex paint. Latex cannot bond to oil based primer and will bubble up and flake off. It wouldn’t matter what you tried to seal it with. The paint wasn’t adhered to the primer. If you’d like the oil bases, then use the oil based primer, oil based paint or enamel, and polyurethane. Polycrylic is for going over water-based paint like latex. (Hence the ‘acrylyic’ in the word) Personally, I despise oil based clean up, and prefer an easy water-based clean up.

        I also highly recommend General Finishes gel stains, high performance topcoat, and paints. In 5 years of painting furniture, i’ve never been unhappy with one of their products. Now, keep in mind, gel stain is oil based, so you should not try to seal with polyacrylic.

        If you want a paint that doesn’t need to be sealed at all, try Fusion Mineral Paint. The minerals form a hard shell that is nearly impossible to harm, once it cures (2 to 3 weeks). I painted my kitchen table in it a year ago, waiting for curing before using daily, and it looks just as good today as the day I did it. I’m going to use it on my cabinets next…

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Kristi
          July 29, 2016 at 10:42 am

          Yes, you actually CAN put both latex and oil-based paint over oil-based primer. Oil-based primer is a completely different thing than oil-based paint, and oil-based primer is formulated to work with either kind of paint.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Mary Anne Looby
    July 18, 2016 at 8:49 am

    First, it is a very pretty color, Second, you should try General Finishes clear coat. It isn’t cheap, but it leaves a beautiful finish. I order mine through Amazon. I got a gallon. You should really try it. It has become very popular. Sometimes you have to shop somewhere other than Lowes or HD. Hope you keep the color. It will look great with your chairs. My bedroom is now Teal and coral and it looks beautiful. Good luck.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Julia
      July 18, 2016 at 9:15 am

      I second the General Finishes High Performance Poly. It is amazing. I refinish furniture as a business and it is what I use through my sprayer, but even a hand done finish looks fantastic. Non yellowing and water based. I would reach out to them they are always generous to send samples to try as well. Once you try it you won’t go back to Minwax-ever. And, I almost exclusively use their milk paints and gel stains. They really do make an exceptional product.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Kathy
    July 18, 2016 at 8:52 am

    Kristi, I’ve used it over latex paint several times with good results. The problem is large flat surfaces. I finally read an article that said you need to almost pour it on and use a squeegee to spread it and that it would settle itself. I used a paint synthetic paint brush and it worked just fine. It is just a little messy. And even then, be prepared to sand between coats.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Micki
    July 18, 2016 at 8:54 am

    I envy your strength.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Ches
    July 18, 2016 at 8:57 am

    I used paste wax on my kitchen table and two end tables I painted. It took a while to cure but I have been so pleased with the sealing results. Just a thought.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    BARBARA BOZEMAN
    July 18, 2016 at 9:00 am

    Every post makes me more glad I elected to follow you. I am going back and forth on a number of projects, including “paint vs stain” quandries and how to go from one to the other. I built and stained a headboard and as I got farther into the bedroom’s 2nd emination, have decided it would be better painted. So I’m glad to see I’m not the only one willing to hit rewind mid-project, to get what I’m happy with. Thanks so much for sharing the “whole journey” not just the varnished one.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Rehj Hoeffner
    July 18, 2016 at 9:00 am

    I think where ppl are going is that you primed it with an oil-based product. My husband, who worked in a paint shop for many years, says, even a layer down, can’t mix them. Perhaps I am misunderstanding what you did to the table…it’s been through quite a journey!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 9:02 am

      Oil-based primer is very different from oil-based paint. Oil-based primer can be topped with either oil-based or latex paint. It’s very different from putting latex paint over oil-based paint.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Betsy
        July 18, 2016 at 10:37 am

        Kristi is correct on this. Water-based paint over oil-based primer is fine. What you can’t do is put an oil-based paint over water-based primer or over anything water-based.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Jo B
        July 28, 2016 at 12:27 am

        This used to be true. However, in the race for faster drying/one coat coverage/premium paint, in the last few years the latex paints have become so much thicker that they don’t form a bond well with the oil based primers anymore. 10 years ago I primed and painted the base boards in our kitchen with KILZ and Behr. No issues to this day. 4 years ago, I did the same for my sons nursery. KILZ and BEHR. One year later, the paint is peeling off in sheets…When I questioned my Master Carpenter friend, he told me the additives in the premium paints are the issue. Suggested using cheap paint once I scraped the expensive stuff off. Be damned if he wasn’t right…

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Kristi
          July 29, 2016 at 10:50 am

          No, it’s actually still true. It says it right there on the can. Latex paint works just fine over oil-based primer.
           
          In fact, if you have a piece of furniture or cabinets that are already painted/coated with an oil-based paint, stain, varnish, etc., the ONLY way to paint over it with latex paint is to first prime with an oil-based primer. Then you can paint with latex right over the top.
           
          I’ve been doing it for years, and it works beautifully. And it says right on the can that you can topcoat the oil-based primer with your choice of oil-based or latex paint. Primers are COMPLETELY different from paints.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Debby
    July 18, 2016 at 9:01 am

    The ONLY way I get a smooth finish with polycrylic is to add a little water and to use a sponge wax applicator with the hand grip. I can’t find the link, but auto zone has them.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Dorrie
    July 18, 2016 at 9:05 am

    I’m thinking that Rustoleum stain may now be Varathane, and I believe it’s available at Home Depot. I loved Rustoleum’s “Kona” but after finding it in a small can, couldn’t find anymore. Noticed the packaging for Varathane looked very similar to the Rustoleum and checked the back. Sure enough it had Rustoleum packaging info on it. They’ve even got their own page on the Rustoleum website! https://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/varathane/

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Athena
      July 18, 2016 at 9:52 am

      Yep, this is what I found after searching forever the find a can of Kona stain sonwe cod match the mantle we built to other wood in the house. I did end up finding some rustoleum Kona from amazon and just getting that but the rustoleum website now lists the varathane products. Might be worth it to try those since you liked the rustoleum so much.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Justin
      July 18, 2016 at 12:37 pm

      At least for awhile, they were two separate products (even though they’re both made by the same company). Are you sure they’ve combined them? HD only seemed to carry the Varathane products, for some reason, even though they carry the traditional Rustoleum products. I don’t get why.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Rebecca B
    July 18, 2016 at 9:13 am

    You sound frustrated Kristi! Frankly I like the natural table top best anyway, it does not look bad from the pictures. Well, you have already refinished the table 5 times so if you have to re do it, hopefully this time you will bbe happy with the result. I would love to see how the dining room looks with all projects done. At least your bumpy finish gives Peeve a little toe hold. If it’s smooth she might just slide across the table! I would just live with the bumpy finish but I know you are a perfectionist.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 9:15 am

      I’m very frustrated. :-/ I could probably live with the texture if it weren’t also streaky and cloudy in areas. That I can’t live with. It’s hard to capture on camera, but in person, it looks terrible.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Rebecca B
        July 18, 2016 at 11:53 am

        When I looked at your picture on my smart phone it wasnt that bad. Then I looked at your picture on my computer, and the finish does look really bumpy. But the natural table top with stained wood was soooo pretty!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Angie
      July 18, 2016 at 11:10 am

      I agree . . . I liked it before. It was beautiful!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Lisa
      July 19, 2016 at 7:56 am

      I agree about the table tops. My favorite was the stained top and black legs.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        angela
        July 19, 2016 at 9:33 am

        me too and I think that combo (stained top and black legs) with the floor would look just fine with out a rug.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Margie
    July 18, 2016 at 9:16 am

    Love the color you choose-would mind sharing brand and color?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 5:03 pm

      It’s all Behr, but it’s a color I mixed myself, so unfortunately I don’t have a name or formula. 🙁

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Andrea
    July 18, 2016 at 9:22 am

    I’ve just started using General Finishes products. Good stuff. Their gels are buttah… Pure buttah. Hassle free. Not cheap by any means. But I was so over crappy products I had seen various items with it and was impressed. I’m converted.☺

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Deanna fuqua
      June 4, 2017 at 4:24 pm

      HOw do y’all apply general finishes high performance topcoat AND Their gel wipe on poly urethane.
      I have painted the table top with gf lack milkpaint and topcoated wiyh their gel topcoat and it has hazy streaks!! It’s driving me crazy I’m usin a large foam brush.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Brenda Pawloski
    July 18, 2016 at 9:26 am

    Is that your condo kitchen cabinet color?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 9:29 am

      No, it’s actually not even close. 🙂 That kitchen cabinet color looks VERY washed out in this house with all of the sunlight. This color is much darker and a more saturated teal color.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jeanne
    July 18, 2016 at 9:28 am

    I highly recommend General Finishes top coat. It is the best I have ever used!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    diane
    July 18, 2016 at 9:37 am

    When I apply polyurethane or water based poly or spar varnish, I always do two things. I use a really good varnish brush and use #0000 steel wool and buff the finish after it has hardened. I usually do at least two coats and then do a final buff. No brushmarks! And the finish is smooth as silk and looks beautiful.

    I have also read that people feel regular varnish has a yellow cast and that is why they use the water-based.

    Your decision o use oil-based is excellent and will give a great finish. You can also buff it with #0000 steel wool to remove any brush marks.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 4:18 pm

      That’s how I apply oil-based poly — either steel wool or 220-grit sandpaper between coats. It turns out beautifully. But this product says specifically do not use steel wool between coats. And while I do try to sand, the texture is just so rough that it takes an electric sander to get it smooth. Between-coat sanding shouldn’t have to be done with a sander. It should be done by hand.

      I do think oil-based paint will be my best bet. I think I’ll head there now and get some, so that I can get this project finished!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Peg Brewer
    July 18, 2016 at 9:46 am

    I have given up on anything made by Minwax, I exclusively use General Finishes. Once you get the hang of their wipe on Poly you will be hooked. Their stains are a dream, so easy to even out the splotches with just a touch of mineral spirits. Cost is a little higher but the results make it worth the price.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Stacy Allred
    July 18, 2016 at 9:47 am

    Have you considered using Benjamin Moore advance paint? It’s a water based alkyd but acts like an oil based paint. Cures really hard and eliminates the need for a top coat. Has worked really well for me.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Melanie
      July 19, 2016 at 2:36 pm

      That’s what I used on my kitchen cabinets! I am pleased with it. It is expensive, though!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    ERIN
    July 18, 2016 at 9:48 am

    I love General Finishes Products!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lynner
    July 18, 2016 at 9:50 am

    What about Formby’s?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Katie
    July 18, 2016 at 9:53 am

    I’ve used Minwax Polycrylic many times over paint. I prefer it over lighter color, matte paints. I think the key is to build up the finish. It looks streaky and terrible until you’ve done many coats. It’s not unusual to do four or five coats before it starts to look good. It dries very fast, so many coats are possible in a short time. I always use a high quality brush and by the last coat the brush marks aren’t very noticeable.

    The only problem I’ve had with polycrylic in the past is using it over a light blue paint. It changed completely changed the color of my paint.

    I’m sorry your project has been so frustrating. Love the color of your table.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jackie
    July 18, 2016 at 9:58 am

    I love their wipe on poly. It comes in a rectangular can and goes on fast and easy and has a very silky finish. I always have drips when I paint any topcoat on.
    It will yellow though…

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 4:25 pm

      I do like the wipe-on poly when I want an oil-based poly. I’ve never had a problem with any of their oil-based polyurethanes. I just don’t like using oil-based poly over painted surfaces.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    AinOakPark
    July 18, 2016 at 10:00 am

    What you really need to do is take a compass, and, measuring exactly 49 inches from the floor, scribe a 4 inch circle. Make another circle around the first that has a 6 inch diameter. Place a third circle around the second one. This circle should have an 8 inch diameter. Paint the center circle and the outer band (leaving an unpainted area between the two) the color of your choice. When it’s dry, bash your head against the center circle. This may not give you relief, but it may set in your mind the lesson you have just learned. I know orange and red clash, but the traditional color for this project is red. If you go with teal using a Minwax product, you will have to change the color anyway, so why not use General Finishes’ red to start?

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Brynne
      July 18, 2016 at 11:18 am

      Wow. I can’t even. So rude!

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        AinOakPark
        July 18, 2016 at 12:00 pm

        Sorry, Brynne! This is what happens in print – it’s hard to read the tone sometimes! It was supposed to have a different tone that you apparently read. It was supposed to be somewhat tongue-in-cheek, suggesting that Kristi is very meticulous (that’s why the directions were so specific) in the way she does things. It was supposed to suggest empathy in that I have felt like bashing my head against a wall many times during DIY projects that have gone awry. It was supposed to suggest that it was hard to choose the right color for things and at the same time acknowledge that she had learned that she is truly unhappy with the Minwax product and that the final product was out of her control with that application.

        If Kristi read it as negatively as you apparently did, I apologize and give her kudos for not deleting those comments deemed negative!

        I am new to this blog and am enjoying it. Kristi is *way beyond* anything I try! I am amazed at what she does! My “big project” this week are to make a wildly printed sink skirt and matching shower curtain for a small and dismal rental bathroom, and to spray paint a brown wrought iron standing floor lamp black. So, you can see we are on opposite sides of the DIY ability scale, and perhaps you can imagine how many times I have wanted to bash my head against the wall in frustration in the past.

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Brynne
          July 18, 2016 at 1:15 pm

          Oh gosh! You’re right – it is so hard to convey tone in print! I’m so sorry! I’m so used to seeing negativity online that it’s easy to jump to conclusions – the tongue-in-cheek aspect went completely over my head this morning. Thank you so much for explaining so graciously!

          And yes – there have been times I have *literally* bashed my head against a handy surface in frustration at a DIY project! 😀

        • Reply To This Comment ↓
          Joyce
          July 18, 2016 at 10:16 pm

          It’s good that you clarified your original statement, because the original did sound terribly rude.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Rodney Gaylor
      July 19, 2016 at 2:13 am

      All I have ever done for Kristi was grunt work (lifting buckets for the kitchen counter tops) or helping to lift a beam into the wall she completely removed in order to open the kitchen to her future breakfast room. But AINOAKPARK, I was happy to hear your apparent surprise at being misunderstood by the responses to your post on K’s blog. Not all of us have the DIY skills and mastery that she and her regulars possess. I am constantly amazed by K and some of the folks that respond to her updates! 🙂

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Sue2
    July 18, 2016 at 10:02 am

    How’s that teal color going to look with the green cabinets of the kitchen?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Janet
    July 18, 2016 at 10:11 am

    I personally liked the black with wood finish top. I think that it would give you more freedom when you are using centerpieces etc. Just a thought. It is really you and what you love that counts.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Joyce
      July 18, 2016 at 10:21 pm

      I agree with Janet.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Lisa
      July 19, 2016 at 8:06 am

      I agree 100%. If the table HAS to be painted, then stain the top dark enough not to clash with the floors and paint the legs the same color as the buffet. I am definitely not a “matchy matchy” decorator, buy I do believe in having 2 pieces that have some unity to them. I also still love the idea of a natural fiber type rug for under the dining table. We have one and we don’t have any problem with moving the chairs.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Alicia Hansen
    July 18, 2016 at 10:12 am

    I am very new to the furniture refinishing game. My friend who is more experienced uses Minwax Polycrylic and that is what I have been using. I am amazed how smoothly it goes on with a sponge. Just a car wash sponge. We cut them up into 4ths or 8ths with a bread knife and then use them to apply the poly. I think the key with polycrylic is that since it is water base and thinner your don’t try to put it on super thick. I have been doing 3 coats on my pieces and am very pleased with the results.

    I love the teal! Best of Luck!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Rose Szymanski
    July 18, 2016 at 10:13 am

    I’m so glad I stumbled across your blog. I’m stupefied at the things you are able to do. I cannot believe how many times you stripped that table to get it right. I’m going to paint my kitchen cabinets (which have been painted 17 times) and am dragggging my feet at having to strip them. You are inspiring.
    That said, so glad I subscribed. (Which I did after I saw the phenomenal barn doors you created). Since then everything I’ve read is great. You are so frank, and real and helpful. Even your followers are helpful. Thank You All!!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Jo B
      July 28, 2016 at 12:16 am

      Rose, hit those cabinets with some Citrustrip gel stripper. You can paint it on even vertical surfaces, and it won’t run off! Leave it for at least one hour per suspected coat of paint. Then go back and the paint slides right off as you scrape! Just make sure you wipe them down well before you paint with some dish detergant and water in a damp rag…I’ve even used it to remove old stain/varnish, rather than using up a bunch of sandpaper…

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 29, 2016 at 10:56 am

      If you’re painting them, why do you need to strip them? I would just sand them a bit to smooth out the existing finish and to give it some “tooth,” prime with a good primer (oil-based Zinsser Cover Stain is my favorite), let it dry thoroughly, sand with 220-grit sandpaper, and then paint. The only reason I stripped my table was because I wanted to try the stained wood top.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Allie
    July 18, 2016 at 10:32 am

    After lots of trial and error and crap products, I will only use the Sherwin Williams Enamel paint on my furniture from now on. It dries so hard and I never have issues with streaks or bubbles. It evens itself out and leaves a really nice, feel/finish on my furniture. You should look into it! My dad owns a painting company and its the only paint they will use on cabinets and trim because of the durability. I think it would work really well on your table.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Kristi C
    July 18, 2016 at 10:32 am

    While I’m sorry you had to go through all this more times than I would have patience for, I gotta tell you this post just makes me love your blog even more. You’re not afraid to say the truth and not sugar coat it. It’s like a breath of fresh air to hear you say what you are really thinking, instead of what will sound pleasant or whatever. And I know it’s an honest opinion and you’re not holding back in case Minwax wants to partner with you someday 🙂

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Michelle B
      July 18, 2016 at 3:13 pm

      I agree! Because every time I try to put clear coat on something, it ends up looking exactly like that table top-streaky, uneven, splotchy, sooooo annoying! I finally quit trying to refinish wood, so I can’t wait to see what Kristi figures out, because I definitely need tutoring in this area!!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lisa
    July 18, 2016 at 10:37 am

    Sorry, not a fan of the painted table. Too many painted pieces….buffet, lamp bases, table…

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Rodney Gaylor
      July 19, 2016 at 2:30 am

      Bwahahahaha… you don’t know Kristi, do you? And I assume you’re house is not in Texas? I lived for many years in South Florida, and I would never have done the things K does in her house. But it works here.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Lisa
        July 19, 2016 at 7:20 am

        Nope. We live in Cincinnati. I did love the buffet when it was painted coral.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lora
    July 18, 2016 at 10:48 am

    I see everyone loves General Finishes. I just used up my first can of their Flat out Flat top coat. It is fantastic, especially if you want a hand rubbed wax look finish. I will wax the whole piece except the top and use the General Finishes on the table top for a streak free more durable finish. I save my upholstery foam scraps and cut them into 3″ x 4″ foam sponges and dip them in a shallow plastic take out container filled with the top coat. Just load up the bottom of the sponge and wipe on row by row overlapping slightly. You can do a table top very quickly and get a great looking finish. Just toss the sponge and container when done.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Betsy
    July 18, 2016 at 11:05 am

    I personally love painted pieces and look forward to seeing how the teal looks in the whole setting. Awesome, no doubt. A couple of weeks ago I finished painting my free standing wood kitchen island, including the wood countertop (which I painted black to match my black quartz countertops). Over my many years of painting walls, furniture, and even floors, Diamond Varathane is my go-to, and that’s what I used this time to give the top added strength. I try to get the one that says “Floor Finish” and “Floor” on the front of the can. I see that they now have a High Traffice formula, which I haven’t tried yet. Other times I’ll use the one that says Diamond Wood Finish on it. I can’t speak on other Rustoleum products, as this is the only one that I and many other professional decorative artists use. It’s been the discussion of many art message boards over the years and that’s how I learned about it. It is water based, tough as nails, goes on smooth in my experience, and never yellows. That said, I’ve also used Modern Masters clearcoat products successfully, and they also have one that protects your piece from UV Rays, which came in handy when I was doing an outdoor sculptural piece. I’ve never used or even seen General Finishes but after reading all the rave reviews here, I’d like to try them.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Ardith
    July 18, 2016 at 11:32 am

    OK, Kristi, I am going to go out on a limb here and suggest that perhaps the real problem you have with this table is more basic. It just may not be the style you really want. The legs on this table may be more detailed than befits your style (and fighting for attention with all the wonderful architectural details in your front area?). Fewer turns might be in order. Simple curved or straight legs might make you happier. Just a thought.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Rodney Gaylor
      July 19, 2016 at 2:58 am

      ARDITH, I (very tentatively) agree the that there may have been a few too many turns in the table legs. Can you show us a few ideas that you think might have better worked in this setting?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lynda
    July 18, 2016 at 11:33 am

    Hi Kristi, I don’t know if this will help or not but years ago my husband & I stained & polyurethaned an unfinished cabinet. After staining, the directions told us to add mineral spirits to the polyurethane. I had never done this before & wasn’t sure what to expect. The result was beautiful. It went on like glass and left absolutely no brush marks or bumps. I can’t recall for sure if it was mineral spirits or lacquer thinner, but a reputable paint store could direct u. Might be worth trying. You’ve worked so hard on this table–how frustrating the final step isn’t working the way you want. Good luck!

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 4:55 pm

      Mineral spirits and lacquer thinner can only be added to oil-based and solvent-based products. They don’t mix with water-based products. 🙂

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    jill
    July 18, 2016 at 11:38 am

    Yet another General Finishes fan here. I’ve used many of their products…milk paint (its not like what you think from the name), chalk paint, gel stains, gel topcoats, high performance water based top coats in various sheens, Arm r seal oil based topcoats (for tabletops), glaze, etc etc. I’ve always been pleased with everything…except maybe wish the cost was a bit cheaper!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Theresa
    July 18, 2016 at 11:45 am

    Ugh. What a pain. Sorry you’re having so much trouble with your table. I have zero DIY skills. So no advise on how to fix it. Maybe you could skip wood altogether and go for a metal base and a glass top? Just a thought. Might keep the room lighter and brighter without having to worry about wood tones.

    I thought the walls were all white now? I see some green on the wall above the teal table. Maybe you haven’t painted that side of the room?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Sylvia Todd
    July 18, 2016 at 12:05 pm

    Good information, and perfect timing for me. I am starting work on an old table, I want to finish stripping it, and stain or paint, and seal it. I’ll now steer clear of MinWax, although that seems to be what the stores in my area carry…..

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Diana
    July 18, 2016 at 12:06 pm

    Every time I use polycrylic I wipe it on and have had no problem with the finish. Maybe because I put on many very light coats.

    However, I am a big big fan of General Finishes too and use it whenever I can.

    I feel your frustration.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jamie
    July 18, 2016 at 12:11 pm

    Kristi, this is the product that I use when painting furniture (and cabinets): http://www.vermontnaturalcoatings.com/product/polywhey-natural-furniture-finish/

    It works really well and I never have to deal with brush strokes or the orange peel texture. Both of my projects were done in the heat and humidity that comes with a Kentucky summer, and I’m so pleased with how they turned out. Now, you do have to let it cure for seven days after the final coat, but for me it was worth it, plus I like how natural it is. I used it on a dresser when I was 7 months pregnant and I could barely smell it (though I did use a mask).

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Ellen
    July 18, 2016 at 12:19 pm

    I have never seen General Finishes in a store here in Birmingham, but I would like to try it. You are so admirably diligent in your efforts! I would have probably set the table on fire out in the front yard, and found another one, but that’s just me. I am not known for my patience! (I actually did burn up a dresser stool in the fireplace once because I was so mad!) You do such fabulous work, it is a shame that you can’t get it exactly like you want it, but I do understand. I have never had much trouble with Polycrylic, but I sometimes add a little water to it by dipping my brush in the water every few times, and I prefer a satin finish. I occasionally use it over chalk paint in matte if there is a necessity to seal a top. I have always preferred Benjamin Moore’s sealer and primers both, so you might give those a try.

    My husband used to work for Lowe’s, but I really never bought any paint for important projects there because they just did not carry great quality paint. If I found anything I liked, you can bet they discontinued it.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Trudy
    July 18, 2016 at 12:20 pm

    Kristi, I believe the problem is you used an oil based primer, then a latex paint. Im surprised you didn’t have a problem at that point. You are never suppose to put water based paint on top of oil based. You can put oil based on top of latex though.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 6:40 pm

      Oil-based primer is very different from oil-based paint. Oil-based primer can be coated with either latex or oil-based paint. It’s the only kind of primer I ever use.
       
      You are correct that you can’t paint latex over oil-based paint though. 🙂 I never do that without priming first.

      • Reply To This Comment ↓
        Trudy
        July 19, 2016 at 6:21 am

        Learn something new everyday. Thank you for setting me straight. I enjoy your blog very much. Although at times I wouldn’t choose the colors you do, I must say they turn out so beautiful. I wish I had your artistic eye. Thanks for blogging!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Justin
    July 18, 2016 at 12:41 pm

    Just a bit of weird irony… In the ad block just above the comments section, Amazon is trying to sell me 4 different kind of Polycryllic. On your website. 🙂

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 18, 2016 at 1:04 pm

      Ugh…I know. :-/ It’s just going from the product mention in the blog post. Unfortunately, it can’t “read” my attitude towards those products. LOL

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Grace
    July 18, 2016 at 1:06 pm

    I know I won’t have the popular comment here but I need to say it…I think you have too many colors going on. Green in the kitchen which is visible from the dining room. Orange chairs, black side board oh wait, is it a different color now? it’s hard to keep up. Now teal. I know your picking up colors from your beautiful and gorgeous mural but IMHO it’s just too many.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Marcia
    July 18, 2016 at 1:21 pm

    I had the same problem recently using Sherwin-Williams paint. I ended up with a streaky, pebbly dresser top as well as four (!) streaky doors. The streaks became apparent when the doors were open and seen at an angle, and they look awful. Fortunately, two of the doors are usually closed. I’ll never use that brand again!

    I can’t really tell that the table is teal. On my laptop it has a gray cast to it, which isn’t the color you describe at all. I’ve used teal, orange, and gold in my boho bedroom; and I love the teal and orange together. Nevertheless, my own preference for your table is still white, which I think would look more elegant as the background for the chairs. I’m sure the teal will work, though, or you wouldn’t have used it. I’m sorry you’re going through such an unpleasant hassle

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Corisa Reimer
    July 18, 2016 at 1:48 pm

    Watco Clear Lacquer
    Seriously, I’ve tried most clear finishes. This is by far the BEST out there!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Tirsa
    July 18, 2016 at 1:55 pm

    Did you go back to green walls? (I see a green wall in front of the teal table.) Or did I misunderstand and you only changed the color on the entryway side?

    Thanks for taking us along for the journey. Makes me feel better about all the mistakes I make and the many times I’ve changed my mind. 🙂

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Bonnie Walker
    July 18, 2016 at 2:11 pm

    Have you tried a cabinet paint? I saw this yesterday at Lowe’s and almost bought it. it covers formica, so imagine it has to be tough. I’ve had the same problems with the poly. Thanks for great posts.

    http://www.lowes.com/pd/Cabinet-Rescue-Bright-White-Eggshell-Latex-Enamel-Interior-Paint-and-Primer-in-One-Actual-Net-Contents-31-fl-oz/3434576

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Brette
    July 18, 2016 at 2:26 pm

    You love to paint? Come to my house. I’ve painted 12 cabinet doors, 8 cabinet drawers and have 9 doors to go. (Just kidding.) I sympathize with your paint frustrations. I’ve got ’em, too. Today’s reformulated paints (EPA regulations) are harder to use than they used to be.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Linda
    July 18, 2016 at 2:28 pm

    LOVE the color, and I know you’ll get it figured out. I get,its just frustrating until you do. Looks similar to your lamp color? Amyeay, I like it sooo much better than the white. 🙂

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Theresa
    July 18, 2016 at 3:36 pm

    I’m learning the hard way as well. I had ok results with a couple of dressers with Minwax polycrylic, and I guess I didn’t mind at first as these were cheap reno pieces for my craft room. However, I just coated a desk for my granddaughter and the top looks terrible. Streaks, some parts shiny, some flat and streaky. Four coats with light sanding in between coats and it looks terrible. Lesson learned. I will try something different next time around. I’m going to live with it on this piece as it is another cheap renovation that I’m sure will be repainted when she outgrows her love of all things pink. I’ll be anxious to hear what you wind up using in the end.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Nicole
    July 18, 2016 at 5:07 pm

    I’m going to give the same advice I gave on this subject back when you were trying to stain the top of the table but feared a splotchy result. I would highly recommend using General Finishes products. They give excellent results every.single.time. I refinished my oak kitchen cabinets and bathroom vanities with their gel stain and poly top coat and they look fabulous. I bought my products on Amazon but some local hardware stores do carry the product. Check their website’s product locator to see if you can get it locally. Minwax products are a waste of money.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Nonna
    July 18, 2016 at 9:14 pm

    My husband has started building guitars as a hobby and they r beautiful..but I’m in charge of staining and I’ve had trouble sev times with the min wax stain…I’ve had to resand and restain a lot..there r splotches …so maybe it’s the product instead of MY ineptitude….I will def check out some of these other brands

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Southern Susie
    July 18, 2016 at 9:50 pm

    Just a thought, but I’m wondering if your frustration in not liking your colors is actually a dislike for the colors or could it be a dislike for the table itself? Every time I look at those table legs, I don’t see Kristi – it just looks too country for you and for your elegant and totally beautiful home and your gorgeous chairs… I’ve experienced a couple of color “do-overs” on pieces that were great deals, but they just weren’t me – took me a while to recognize it wasn’t the wrong color, it was the wrong piece of furniture… Once I got the right piece of furniture, the color really didn’t matter so much… Again, just food for thought – I know whatever you do will be beautiful.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Ellen W.
      July 19, 2016 at 9:35 am

      I’ve wondered that, too. This room has morphed considerably as you’ve worked on it. It may no longer suit the room it has become. But I also agree with Susie that whatever you end up with will be beautiful. On another note, I don’t know anything about finishes, but I do see that you can get Rust-Oleum polyurethane delivered to you from Amazon. Right to your front door. You don’t have to ever use the other product again.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Lori
    July 18, 2016 at 10:08 pm

    I recently tried Polyvine water based wax varnish over Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. It is a UK product. I love it! I ordered the satin finish online and after trying to apply it with a brush, switched to a Handiwipe. I thought why couldn’t I apply this like wipe on poly. It says to apply sparingly so I thought why not. Some of us painting with Annie Sloan are using it instead of the wax. I was really impressed with it. I used it on a dining table. Just a suggestion I’m passing along.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    K Rose
    July 18, 2016 at 10:33 pm

    I know that you aren’t going to want to hear this, but I think that part of the reason that you’re having such an issue with the table is that the top looks too small for such a large base. To me, giving more clearance around the bottom lip of the table would help “balance” it out. I love your work and that table base is beautiful! I just wish that the base was a bit smaller.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Laurie
    July 19, 2016 at 9:03 am

    Are you using oil-based or water-based polycrylic? I am currently painting all the wood trim in my house and my kitchen cabinets and have been using the semi-gloss water-based polycrylic on the trim and satin water-based polycrylic on the cabinets over water-based (Benjamin Moore cabinet/trim enamel) and have been getting smooth results. I have been using a very, very fine paint brush that is designed for final finishes to smooth the surface. (I am using oil-based primer under the paint). I’ve painted when it has been humid (though we had AC running inside but not in the garage where some items are painted). I’ve painted when it was dry outside and when it has been raining. Other than the drying time being longer on the wet or humid days, I haven’t noticed any issues. I’ve never tried Rustoleum poly since most of the stores near me seem to carry mostly the Minwax. Only issue I did have was when I stupidly tried water-based primer on the first cabinet door and it flaked so I striped it and sanded it down and redid it with oil-based primer. I have been using water-based primer on the trim though the enamel paint I got is also self-priming.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 19, 2016 at 9:18 am

      Polycrylic is water-based. I think the difference is that you’re painting trim, which is very narrow and long. I’m painting a large, flat table top. Large and flat surfaces are always a challenge to get a perfectly smooth and even finish on.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Brent
    July 19, 2016 at 9:12 am

    I have nothing helpful to add, other than I have NEVER had a good, smooth experience using any of Minwax’s products. They’re all terrible, Polycrylic being particularly egregious. Rustoleum products/Varathane all the way!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    JoAnne
    July 19, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Kristi,

    I love the teal, but wonder how it will look with all the other beautiful colors you have in the room. I also wonder how the table would look if it was all black to match the buffet? Then, you could do a table runner in the same fabric that is on the back of your chairs? The possibilities of adding different fabric table runners in your colors could add interest and you could change it out whenever you wanted to.

    I love everything you do – the room is such a standout already.

    JoAnne

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Kelli
    July 19, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    Maybe Safecoat Acrylacq? (Sorry, too lazy to google the correct spelling. I think I remember it being something off like that) I used it over BM Advance paint on a dining bench, and it looked smooth to me.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Susan
    July 19, 2016 at 6:12 pm

    So many comments! I feel your pain. Soooo frustrating for you.
    Hubs sandblasted our forty year oak kitchen cabinet era with Nicole glass beads to get the old finish off.
    Then sprayed the mixed stain of red mahogany and English chestnut.
    Then again sprayed a lacquer finish over everything. It Has been 8 years and I have only had to retouch up the sink base cabinet once in minor areas. I think we used Vararhane wood lacquer. It comes in a spray can or can be poured into a sprayer. Arduous but the look great!

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    SheilaG- Plum Doodles
    July 19, 2016 at 7:12 pm

    I have always had that trouble with Minwax poly. I thought it was my fault, that I just couldn’t do it right. Like others have said, the GF products work so much better, but I still have problems with large flat surfaces, even with GF. I would like to try polyvine, have heard good things about it.
    On another note, I’m wondering if you can’t get the color right because the style of the table just isn’t what you really want? No matter what color you paint it, it still looks like a country, farmhouse table. I love it, but I just wonder if that’s not really your style?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Cee Cee
    July 21, 2016 at 9:39 am

    Could you use Waterlox? I know that it’s amber so maybe go more blue in paint color to make the teal? It says it can be used over paint.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      July 21, 2016 at 9:46 am

      I tried that on my painted floor in the kitchen, and it ruined it. I’ve never tried the water-based Waterlox, though. That might work.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Angie
    July 21, 2016 at 10:03 am

    The Walmarts here in Memphis have started carrying Rustoleum stains and finishes. It’s not as large a selection as Lowe’s had but it’s better than nothing. Maybe your stores have it also.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Surani
    July 21, 2016 at 4:05 pm

    Hi,

    For someone working at your level you probably want to move to a higher-quality brand, but I thought I’d share how I got Mixwax Polycrylic to work.

    I put it on as gently as I possibly could with a brush, and I had streaks and – more importantly – thousands of tiny bubbles that dried on into a horrible mess.

    Finally, I took some old pieces of 100% cotton T-shirts and crumpled some up to form a ball, and then covered the ball with 3 or 4 more pieces pulled tightly around to make a smooth surface. I twisted the edges of the cover pieces and tied them, and then dipped the smooth surface of the T-shirt ball into the Polycrylic and gentle wiped it on. With two layers I got a finish that made me happy (a pine captain’s bed stained with Minwax ebony).

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Tanya
    July 22, 2016 at 11:15 am

    Given the color that you want, have you heard about a product called unicorn spit? Their website is http://www.unicornspit.com. The colors are beautiful.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Adam
    March 14, 2017 at 9:06 am

    This is much too late for you, but perhaps someone else can benefit from it. Apply polycrilic with a foam brush in straight lines. Keep a wet edge, but don’t apply too thick. After the poly has sat 1-2 minutes (even if the entire job is not finished) come back with a very light end-to-end brush stroke. Don’t do this multiple times if you can avoid it. When dry, sand (220-400) by hand just lightly enough to soften the high spots. The instructions recommend sanding between each layer but I’ve found the first sanding is by far the most important. Other applications should apply smoothly.

    Also, the image above does not look like the polycrilic itself is giving the bumpy look. It looks like the paint was rolled on by a paint roller which produced that pattern. The layer of polycrilic, however, amplifies these imperfections.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Vicki @ Entri Ways
    June 22, 2017 at 6:37 pm

    I have to agree with you on the Minwax satin polycrylic. It’s very hard to apply and you do see streaks, especially on dark colors. I only use the satin on whites. I use the Matte finish Polycrylic on any dark paints or stains and it works really well. You don’t even see it when it dries. General Finishes Flat Out Flat topcoat is a great topcoat too.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Sam
    October 10, 2017 at 9:13 am

    general finishes gel stain is INCREDIBLE!!! highly recommend. used it on a maple table that was ugly orange, and it came out beautifully. then topped it with miniwax matte polycrylic, which actually got the job done (after 6 coats)

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Matt
    February 10, 2018 at 3:51 pm

    I have a very similar table and wanted to paint the legs but w the brush if comes out streaky – what tool did u use or reccomend to have a smoother finish on the rounded legs?

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Alex
    February 6, 2019 at 12:26 pm

    I absolutely love polycrylic. I haven’t found anything short of epoxy that is as durable. Your issue seems to be way too think of a base coat. It MUST be applied in several very thin coats literally brushing over it until it’s tacky and the sheen disappears. After 2 to 3 coats like this, then you can apply a little thicker, sanding between every 2 coats… The final coat can be like glass, but it still must be sanded with 400 up to 1500 grit, and buffed(after a few days of curing.)

    The product is amazing, but it needs to be used correctly.

    • Reply To This Comment ↓
      Kristi
      February 6, 2019 at 1:25 pm

      No, my problem with it is that it dries too fast, making brush strokes inevitable. In my opinion, it’s a crap product. General Finishes is the only thing I’ll use now. It’s in a completely different league from Polycrylic, and you don’t have to deal with some finicky application process.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Jim
    March 1, 2019 at 2:47 pm

    My first use of Minwax. I have just painted a large table to cream, with a finish of Minwax Polycrylic. I gave it a coat with a very high quality synthetic (expensive) paint brush. The lines were terrible. I sanded all the Minwax off. I then used a foam paint brush. Finish was worse, with lots of lines plus masses of pimples that might have been air bubbles. So it was all sanded off again. I then sprayed it using an HVLP sprayer. No thinning. I used the Minwax as it came out of the tin. I have just finished my fourth coat. The finish is perfect.

  • Reply To This Comment ↓
    Paulune
    March 23, 2019 at 6:18 pm

    I chalk painted my cast iron tub that already had been painted white so it didn’t need a primer. Two coats and it looked great. Put Minwax polyacrylic over that and ruined the whole thing. Thick white streaks and bumpy. Tried to talk to a snotty Minwax tech and he wouldn’t listen to me, he said the product wasn’t meant to be immursed. I wasn’t using it on the inside of the tub plus I won’t even be using the tub for bathing! I chalk painted it again. Not sure if I could use a matte finish water based polyurethane clear coat on it now?

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